About 

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Candace Couse (she/her) is a Canadian artist living in the Fraser Valley in British Columbia. She is a grateful guest on the traditional territory of the Stó:lō People. She earned an MFA from The University of Calgary (2010)and a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Brock University (2020). 

Her practice has long investigated sickness through autobiographical accounts of illness narratives in visual art. She is interested in what these works do for the artists, viewers and broader understanding of health towards empathy and justice. Since 2021, she has been working with people and artists living with dementia, exploring collaboration and cross-generational exchange through arts-based methodologies. Couse's creative research is deeply intimate, exposing personal history with her body and illness as well as exploring the fragility of an embodied existence alongside incredible collaborators. This work is conducted under the premise that art practice can tell us something valuable about the social, historical and political ecology and impact of health and disease. 

As a 2012 finalist and prize winner from The Premio Arte Laguna, an international competition organized by the Cultural Association MoCA and Art Laguna, her work was exhibited at the Institute Romeno of Culture and Humanistic Research in Venice, Italy. Other highlights of Couse's professional art practice include: finalist, Kingston Prize, 2013; Artfunkl Residency Prize, Manchester, UK (2013); Iaab residency Prize, Basel, Switzerland (2012); SIM residency, Reykjavik, Iceland (2022), Toronto Urban Film Festival (TUFF) 2013 Winner: Special Jury Prize; Vancouver Asian Film Festival (VAFF) Selection (2012); Ottawa International Animation Festival Showcase Selection (2012); She has had the honour of writing and directing a short film with The National Film Board of Canada, titled Sick/Malade, and has shown across Canada, the USA, UK, Switzerland, Italy, Trinidad, Pakistan, Nepal, Iceland and India. Couse has taught in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and France.